Monthly Archives: August 2020

Faith Over Fear

I coughed.

Allergies have been a part of my life for years. So, when I got a tickle in my throat while preaching, it was nothing new. I just needed to clear my throat and maybe cough it out just a bit.

But a simple cough in today’s world can be enough to induce fear and anxiety in others. Though I was yards from the nearest person, I knew my little cough, inevitable as it was, would cause some anxiety and worry and maybe even a bit of panic in the age of pandemic.

But is fear the right response? Should our anxiety climb at every sniff of a nose? While precaution is understandable, ought panic to be?

The Bible tells us “God has not given us a spirit of fear, but one of power, love and sound judgment.” (2 Tim. 1:7) God’s word says, “Don’t worry about anything, but in everything, through prayer and petition with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.” (Phil. 4:6)

Faith is the Christian response to difficulites and problems. Fear is the enemies effort to keep you from trusting God and depending upon his power and peace.

We should, of course, exercise common sense and take necessary precautions. I’m not advocating for a lack of concern for others or of safety protocols. Remember, however, that God doesn’t want us to plunge into the pool of fear, worry and anxiety. Our culture is filled with people wallowing in that puddle. We Christians have something far greater than fear. We have faith.

We know God is bigger than our problems. God can be trusted with our future. God offers peace over panic. We don’t have to fear even sin and death because Jesus conquered those enemies on our behalf.

So, trust God in the middle of a pandemic. Live by faith instead of fear. Tell him your needs. Ask for his wisdom and protection. And always remember that “The peace of God which supasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.” (Phil. 4:7)

Faith over fear.

Even if someone coughs!

The Benefits of the Long Term Pastorate

This month marks 25 years since I came to FBC O’Fallon, IL as pastor. I do note that I don’t get called “the young pastor” as much as I did then. I wonder why that is? Hmmm….

While 25 years isn’t nearly as long as some (I have two pastor friends who have been at their churches for more than 50 years), it does cause me to consider some benefits to staying at the same place. I’m not suggesting that all pastors should stay at their churches forever. But I am suggesting that pastors go to a church with the willingness to stay there for the rest of their pastoral ministry should the Lord will.

Here are 5 benefits to a long term pastorate.

1. You can influence your community. Staying a longer times means you have an opportunity to make an impact that couldn’t happen otherwise. You get to know people in your area even outside of your church family. By staying a long time, I’ve had the opportunity to know and have some influence among regional officials, business leaders, fellow pastors and others. I know them and they know me just by virtue of me being around for a while.

2. You can experience real love. It is one thing to be loved for your role; it is another to be loved for being you. I appreciate those who honor the office of the pastor. That is a good thing and I am thankful for those who love and appreciate me for being in that position. But, I am very thankful for people who love me just as me. They love and appreciate me as a person and not just because I fill this position. That is special.

3. You can build trust. The best way to build trust is to be trustworthy. And being trustworthy for a long time builds a lot of trust capital. Building trust means people assume the best in you and not the worst. It means they will listen to your thoughts even when they might not agree. It means they value your opinion because they know you are trying to do the right thing for the sake of the kingdom. They know you aren’t infallible, but they trust that you are trying to point them in the right direction.

4. You can see the long term results of your work. It is a lot of fun to baptize the children of people you baptized years before. It is rewarding to see people you knew as young people in your church now serving as teachers of small groups and deacons and pastors and missionaries. Long term ministry means you get a long term perspective. Staying allows you to see some of the fruit of the trees you planted years before.

5. You can bring stability to your life, family and church. While there are dangers that come with stability, there are benefits as well. I know the patterns that work best for a sustainable ministry in my context. My family got to have some stability in their personal relationships because we stayed. And, our church got the continuity that comes with having the same pastor. In our context (suburbia, a transient military community), that matters a great deal.

Staying at a church a long time doesn’t mean there are never any problems or that ministry is easy. But it does have some advantages that come no other way.

Ministry friends, maybe the Lord will have you move every 2 or 3 years for the rest of your life. But, consider the possibility that he will have you put down some deeper roots and stay in one place for a long time.

Excuse me now as I begin to make some contingency plans for what I will say at my 50th anniversary!